About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CNNW 17
CSPAN 13
FOXNEWS 13
CNN 12
MSNBCW 11
MSNBC 6
CSPAN2 4
CNBC 2
KGO (ABC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
FBC 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LINKTV 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 108
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)
stands on key foreign policy challenges, including iran's nuclear amibitions. salt lake, known city, known for skiing and snow in the winter, not dangerous smog. new pictures coming up as we approach the bottom of the hour and live news right here in "studio b." make it worth watcng. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeÑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food diffently. just $11.99. offer ends soon! ( bell rings ) they remwish i saw mine of my granmore often, but they live so far away. i've been thinking about moving in with my daughter and her family. it's been pretty tough since jack passed away. it's a good thing you had life insurance through the colonial penn program. you're right. it was affordable, and we were guaranteed acceptance. guaranteed acceptance? it means you can't be turned down because of your health. you don't have to take a physical or answer any health questions.
of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
foreign policy as well. senator john kerry laid out his vision at the senate confirmation hearings yesterdays, and it relies as much on economics as diplomasy. >> we know that american foreign policy is not defined by drones and deployments alone. more than ever foreign policy is economic policy. the world is competing for resources in global markets. >> jennifer: the obama/kerry foreign policy doctrine might be it's the economy stupid, and in fact it is really a economic strategy. much of the violence was driven by individuals financial insecurity as a result of the poverty. look at the arab spring which economic grievances lead to political revolution. a fruit selling started that protest by lighting himself on fire. his protest lead to the oh eventually overthrow of a decade's long dictatorship, and since then life has improved for tunisian. here is one union worker describing the change. >> the main benefit of the revolution is the disappearance of the state of fear which was dominating a large spectrum of our population. >> jennifer: and even though fea
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington times." the headline says "tears and rage on benghazi." we begin with an exchange between the secretary and senator ron johnson. [video clip]journal > >> do you agree that a simple phone call -- that was a piece of in
not talk about the foreign policy, they did not even have a positive economic plan. they said it will be a referendum on an unsatisfactory referendum -- unsatisfactory performance of the incumbent. the stock market was stronger. it was just good enough to drag president obama across the finish line. i think there's plenty to look at. there are plenty of problems. project orca, the get-out-the- vote project. the message is much too limited, too smug, too assumed that people would reject liberal policies because we said they were liberal. the failure to provide a positive reforming conservative agenda. where was the romney health care plan, the positive plan, not just or peeling -- repealing obamacare? i do think scott walker, sam brownback, bob jindal, that is where you alcee conservative principles govern. in washington, a half to boast -- both oppose the obama administration, collaborate, and in the house, they have to figure out what it means to the beat -- to be the majority of one body of congress while the presidency and other house and congress is held by the other party
engagement in the rest of the world. the tone of cool detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
that bigger question about putting and placing benghazi within the scope of a broader failure of foreign policy. and that's going to have to be what they're going to do if they're going to talk about chuck hagel. highlight the obama failure in this area and that chuck hagel is going to be a yes man for that strategy. if they're not able to do that in a hearing like this, they've been pressing for for months, it does not bowed wede for her-- >> and what about her state and benghazi now a negative concerns and arms control deal with russia, you were not enamored of, i recall. overall, what's her legacy? >> she's one of the most traveled secretary of state and diplomacy to her credit well. and sort of a famous figure who went to many countries. in terms of her influence on obama policy or much of any sort of achievements, it's impossible to me to point to anything and what's more remarkable about the hearings, that she sounded very hawkish and america must lead in north afri africa, we must halt the spreading-- >> you can't have a vacuum, but that's the policy that the administration has be
foreign policy and hopefully tomorrow in john kerrey's hearing before the senate foreign relations committee we'll get into that because the real issue is the date on obama foreign policies. >> thank you. phil mickelson, tiger woods, lebron jamgs and derek jeter, guess, what they're all supply siders. i'm going to try to explain that to you up next. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i thi
this week's press pass conversation with vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institute, martin indyk, on some of the big bets president obama is making during his second term in foreign policy. that's on meetthepress@msnbc.com. we'll be back next week. if it's sunday, it's "meet the press." >>> weapons have no place. >> people need to feel safe. >>> more than six weeks since newtown and the gun debate takes center stage in d.c. you are watch msnbc. we will talk to connecticut senator about what is realistically going to get done. plus president obama sits down with hispanic caucus leaders to talk about immigration reform. congress woman sanchez was one at the meeting. >>> she is packing up and moving out and heading home. what is next for hillary clinton? we will check in with one of the long-time residents of hillary land. president obama is urging gun control advocates to listen to voices of americans who grew up hunting. if you grew up and your dad gave you a hunting rifle when you were ten and that became part of your family's traditions you would see why
's behavior. >> it's consistent with what we found out is actually this administration's foreign policy, the foreign policy is, what difference does it make? >> illegal immigration bad for america, and the fact is we have 11 million people in this country more or less that are undocumented and i don't know anyone that's happy about that. >> iranian police first arrested the pastor in 2009 for spreading christianity and abdeane says the iranian government prognosis promises and agreed. and she says she was blind sided by her husband's current arrest, he was arrested for attempting-- >> dead spin.com reported there was no girlfriend and that manti te'o was part after hoax and he was the victim even though he stuck to it even after learning of hoax. >> girl i committed myself to died on september 12th and now i get a call on december 6th and saying that it's a lie and i'm going to be put on national tv later and ask the same questions. what would you do? >> all that and much more ahead, but first, many lawmakers questioning why the u.s. would send 16 highly advanced f-16 fighter jets to eg
in the president's attitude, certainly in his approach to foreign policy. you'll recall from the beginning of administration, the word engagement was, in fact, a guidepost for how we were going to try to deal with adversaries as well as in terms of how you try to deal with resolving conflict. so, i think engagement as such is not new. there's als been a premise to that engagement. it's engagement without illusion. the president has looked at iran as a country that is pursuing a nuclear weapons capability and he's made it clear his objective is to prevent that, not to live with it. his preferred approach is to resolve it through peaceful means, resolve it by engaging with iranians, getting ourselves and others to engage, but to get the iranians to change their objective. the end result may be preferably achieved through diplomacy but the implication is if diplomacy does not work, force may be likely. >> you listen to what the president said in terms of interpretation from israel, couple with what ma hud barack was saying, if that kind of back-channelling doesn't work. are we at odds with is
immediate. that is why we need political leaders who will make the case. on the campaign, foreign policy is different than domestic policy. you might have seen this people don't ask what do you think we should do abouts? what do you think about the second amendment? they ask you're going protect my second amendment rights, aren't you? they ask that about libya and afghanistan. we experience the economy or the domestic policy first-hand in our churches, in our workplace. very few people including the people here in washington experience the world first-hand. there is more opportunity for leadership and persuasion in foreign policy than in domestic policy. unfortunately, our prosecutor does not try to make that case. >> on the subject of guns, i take it you're not a gun controller. do you regard any of president obama's proposals as reasonable? something that one should swallow? >> i think his proposals will be ineffective. i think they are provepbt to be ineffective of the assault weapons ban. there is no impact on crime in general or mass murderer in particular. there was an assault weap
on the foreign policy side. that's true. that is certainly a different choice for chief of staff when the economy remains issue number one. the fact of the matter is that jacob lew moving from chief of staff over to the treasury department and joe biden are perfectly capable of managing capitol hill and what needs to be done next in terms of bills and the budget and all of that kind of stuff. i think what makes mcdonough choice so interesting is it's a legacy choice. this is a man who has been at the president's side since the president's national career started as a freshman senator. he was there through the election. he has been at the white house all this time. this is a man whose loyalties to the president and who will protect the president, which is really the number one job of chief of staff. i think it's a very interesting choice and someone that the president trusts fully because now the president is putting together what will be these final years of the obama era and this is a man that he trusts to protect the obama era. >> candy, people might not know this. when the president gets that
promoted the internet and facebook, twitter as tools in diplomacy and foreign policy making, probably more than any other person working in our government. >> sounds like a very modern secretary of state but does come at a price in benghazi and that hearing she had where she said, does it really matter what happened on the ground? this will come back to haunt her no matter what she does. >> if she runs for president, though some of the sound bites from the hearings will obviously be used by her republican opponents and opponents and the like because there is a great retort to her that if you take that sound bite, it does matter and you hear republicaninging doing that this week. i would say benghazi is the low water mark. but plenty of other achievements. if she writes the memoir right she might be able to frame benghazi and the emotion she has of losing the lives of those americans in benghazi under her watch. >> she was criticized for not dumping bill during the monica lewinsky affairs. still one of the most admired woman in the world and leaves the secretary's position with very high nu
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
of staff. he has advised the president on foreign policy for nearly a decade, serving as the president of beauty national security advisor. -- deputy national security advisor. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states accompanied by esther jacob lew and mr. denis mcdonough. >> thank you. thank you, everybody. please, everybody, have a seat. good afternoon, everybody. welcome to the announcement of one of the worst kept secrets in washington. as president, i rely on a team of men and women here at the white house every day. i rely on my chief of staff to keep up with them and our entire government. making sure we are moving in the same direction. making sure that my priorities are being carried out in our policies are consistent with the commitments i have made to the american people and we are delivering progress to the american people. i could not be more grateful to jack lew for his amazing service first as our omb, then at the state department, and ultimately as my chief of staff. as he prepares for his confirmation hearings and the challenge of meeting our treasu
have a different engagement with the world. that both changes foreign policy but it also potentially frees up resources in domestic policy. >> he can use that as a springboard to say now that we have the opportunity, we must seize the moment. he's got this whole -- his wife now is getting very involved in the politics of this. she's going to be very involved in this. wow, look at that picture. whoa. >> i think we should acknowledge this is the anniversary of martin luther king day. he took that moment to pause before the statue in -- >> he wrapped himself in it the cloak of martin luther king today. >> something he hasn't always done in office -- >> very, very purposeful -- >> yes, i think that was sort of -- and you can see the concecon -- that martin luther king was so courageous, that i'm going to really state what i believe, here and now. >> i think it was martin luther king revisited. >> well, i'm not so sure i'd go that far. >> i know they don't. the white house, they don't. >> but i do believe that he -- the moment called for sort of laying out what you stand for. paying homag
would like to have which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the host country. this all a discussion about well, there might have been five security people on the ground, if only there was more funding or deployment, or this cable or that cable maybe there would be eight or nine security people on the ground which might have led to more protection or might have led to more casualties. in washington, the decision was made to provide well more than 16 security people to libya and nobody that i know in washington, dc, was involved in the issue of how many of those were in benghazi going with the ambassador or there in advance. the decision that all 16 weren't with him was a decision you cannot blame either political party or anyone in washington. ultimately, all we can have in our embassies is enough to keep off a militant attack for a few hours and after that if the host country doesn't come to a rescue it doesn't matter if we have three, six, 12, 16, or 36 armed guards and marines at the location. an aspe
ambitions. senator kerry took heat for president obama's foreign policy which he supports, but says time is running out for the regime. >> the president has made it definitive. we will do what we must do to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon and i repeat here today, our policy is not containment. it is prevention. and the clock is ticking on our efforts to secure responsible compliance. >> i hope you would help me with because in your testimony you alluded to president obama's vision for the world and the two years i've been here, i've struggled to fully understand what that vision is. >> on syria, another hot spot they'll face, senator kerry and senator mccain, a democrat and republican, said every day that goes by, it gets worse, shep. >> shepard: he was also, senator kerry, put into position to defend another of the president's cabinet nominees. >> that's right. his nomination is not controversial. he's well-known and plenty of experience and so he's expected to be a shoe in. but senator chuck hagel, the nominee to be the next secretary of defense has taken some heat and tod
on jobs and on foreign policy, making america stronger in trade and national security. >> the way you talk it makes it sound as if we don't have a really divided congress. talking to people on both sides pretty much every day of my work day. >> nothing worthwhile is easy and every inch of ground the president has to gain. but a lot of wind at his back right now and i won't say he will do lay-ups, but this president delivered through his first term. he has been able to do a lot in the first term. the second term will be a good one. >> do you think we'll hear in the inauguration address that talks about that? will you hear -- they told us, unity and hopeful. that's about it. but do you think you will hear -- he will talk about reaching out an olive branch to republicans? >> this is a republican i have heard talk about the importance of america americans to step up. democracy is not a spectator sport. he needs all of us to be involved. all of us need to step up and play a role in the destiny of our country. in the end of the day, this is one of the greatest speakers we have seen in my generat
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
is gun control, the economy, health care overhaul. >> and foreign policy is always an issue. so you have the arab spring. most people think that that could be ushering a lot of democracy into the middle east, but we don't know. there's still a lot of tension there. that's going to be an issue for him, as well. >> the plate is full. so enjoy the party today, because the work starts tomorrow. in fact, some republicans are having a little retreat in vegas right now to get out of d.c. so hopefully the partisanship eases a little bit. >> about 100 of them have departed. >> never dull. >>> also some other news this morning, we want to wish our friend and colleague barbara walters a speedy recovery. she was hospitalized saturday after a minor fall in washington. barbara, who is now 83 years old, fell on the stairs at the british ambassador's residence and cut her forehead. she is alert and telling everyone what to do, which is a good sign. she's in the hospital for tests and for some observation. and will not be unfortunately part of abc's inaugural coverage today. >>> investigators ruled out e
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
, yesterday the president didn't touch on foreign policy very much in his inauguration speech, but he did a little bit. i just wanted to play you a part of what he said. here's the president. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. >> senator, obviously few would disagree with what he said there. it's pretty basic, eloquently said, as much of what he says is. but with three americans dead in a terror attack in 48 hours before he was speaking, would it have made sense to perhaps mention that? >> well, erin, i'm not going to parse with you exactly what the president said in his inaugural address. his second inaugural address. i will simply comment that i just returned on sunday from a visit to egypt, afghanistan, jordan, i
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)